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Call for Participation for AMIA 2023 Informatics Summit

The submission process is now closed. Decisions will be announced in December.

AMIA is pleased to invite submissions for the AMIA 2023 Informatics Summit. Attendees will experience content dedicated to Translational Bioinformatics, Precision Medicine, Clinical Research Informatics, Data Science and Artificial Intelligence (AI) in one integrated conference experience.

We look forward to receiving submissions that describe the latest innovations and knowledge that you are creating and implementing. Sessions will be distinctly categorized within one of our three major tracks for the AMIA 2023 Informatics Summit.

Classify Your Proposal

We invite submissions that advance the AMIA 2023 Informatics Summit. Work describing fundamental informatics methods as well as systems and applications are both welcome.

To classify your proposal, you’ll need to decide on a few things:

  1. Programmatic Track
  2. Highlighted Theme (Optional)
  3. Keywords
  4. Submission Category


Programmatic Track

Authors will be asked to select the appropriate programmatic track for their submission from our three core areas:

The development of storage, analytic, and interpretive methods to optimize the transformation of increasingly voluminous biomedical data, and genomic/omics data, into proactive, predictive, preventive, and participatory health. Translational bioinformatics includes research on the development of novel techniques for the integration/interpretation of biological and clinical data and the evolution of clinical informatics methodology to drive precision medicine efforts. The end product of translational bioinformatics is newly found knowledge from these integrative efforts and actionable data for use by a variety of stakeholders, including biomedical scientists, clinicians, and patients.

 

The use of informatics in the discovery and management of new knowledge relating to health and disease. Clinical research informatics includes management of information related to clinical trials and involves informatics related to secondary research use of clinical data. Clinical research informatics and translational bioinformatics are the primary domains related to informatics activities to support translational research.

The science and art of developing data-driven solutions through comprehension of complex real-world health problems, employing critical thinking and analytics to derive knowledge from multi-modal and heterogenous data. Health Data Science and AI is an emergent discipline, arising at the intersection of statistics, computer science, and biomedicine. Solutions to tackle multi-modal and heterogeneous data problems often require integrative approaches using methods from multiple fields. Data Science/Artificial Intelligence track submissions can be focused on development of novel methodologies, analytics, and/or use cases.


Highlighted Theme

Additionally, authors may optionally choose to designate their submission if it fits within one of the highlighted themes chosen for the AMIA 2023 Informatics Summit.

Formerly called "Implementation"

Although much work in informatics is “applied”, the Applied theme focuses on highly pragmatic and operational/support activities that support translational research. This includes the development, deployment, management, and evaluation of innovative informatics tools, platforms, and interventions across clinical research informatics, data science, and translational bioinformatics. Applied work can include gap analyses, requirements gathering, software dissemination approaches, and implementation use cases that incorporate translational bioinformatics or data science methods into patient care. The goal is to improve the usability, accuracy, and efficiency of informatics solutions that have a real-world impact on informatics professionals, researchers, care providers, and/or patients.

Many models of data analysis have been explored for TBI, CRI and Data Science. These models include federated data networks (e.g., ACT, OHDSI, PCORnet), centralized data enclaves (e.g., All of Us, N3C), and a push to cloud computing for large-scale genomic analyses (e.g., AnVIL, Cancer Genomics Cloud).  Submissions to this theme could describe infrastructure/algorithms/governance for conducting large scale data analyses across multiple institutions, propose new models or workflows for scaling analyses, or debate different models used to date.

Research participants remain central to clinical and translational research and are a core pillar of the work presented at the Informatics Summit.  Submissions to this theme will highlight the work of citizen scientists making contributions to the field of informatics, as well as how institutions are improving their engagement with research participants throughout the research lifecycle.


Keywords

Authors will be asked to designate up to three keywords for their proposals in our online submission form. These keywords will be used to match proposals to reviewers and to help organize the accepted submissions into sessions/tracks. While we recognize no classification scheme is perfect, please choose terms that best characterize your proposal.

  • Application of advanced data visualization tools and techniques
  • Bioimaging techniques and applications
  • Biomarker discovery and development
  • Biomedical informatics and data science workforce education
  • Citizen Science and role of patient-participants in big data
  • Clinical decision support for translational/data science interventions
  • Clinical genomics/omics and interventions based on omics data
  • Clinical and research data collection, curation, preservation, or sharing
  • Clinical trials innovations
  • Cohort discovery
  • Collaborative workflow systems
  • COVID-19
  • Data commons
  • Data-driven research and discovery
  • Data Integration
  • Data Literacy and numeracy
  • Data/system integration, standardization and interoperability
  • Data mining and knowledge discovery
  • Data quality
  • Data security and privacy
  • Data sharing / interoperability
  • Data standards
  • Data transformation/ETL
  • Digital research enterprise
  • Drug discovery, repurposing, and side-effect discovery
  • Education and Training
  • EHR-based phenotyping
  • Enterprise data warehouse/Data lake
  • Epigenomics
  • Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues
  • Exposome and Data Integration
  • FHIR
  • Genomic/Omic data interpretation
  • Genotype-phenotype association studies (including GWAS)
  • Geographical information systems (GIS)
  • Health Information and biomedical data dissemination strategies
  • Health literacy issues and solutions
  • Implementation Science
  • Infectious disease modeling
  • Informatics for cancer immunotherapy
  • Informatics research/biomedical informatics research methods
  • Integrative omic analysis
  • Knowledge representation, management, or engineering
  • Learning healthcare system
  • Machine learning and predictive modeling
  • Medical Imaging
  • Measuring outcomes
  • Mobile Health, wearable devices and health applications in the Internet of Things (IoT)
  • Natural Language Processing
  • Ontologies
  • Open Science for biomedical research and translational medicine
  • Outcomes research, clinical epidemiology, population health
  • Patient centered research and care
  • Pharmacogenomics
  • Phenomics and phenome-wide association studies
  • Public health informatics
  • Recruitment technologies
  • Reproducible research methods and tools
  • Single Cell Analysis
  • Secondary use of EHR data
  • Social determinants of health
  • Stakeholder (i.e., patients or community) engagement
  • Sustainable research data infrastructure
  • Systems biology and network analysis
  • Transcriptomics


Submission Category

All proposals must conform to the format and presentation requirements described herein. See the submission file requirements to find more details on page layout, references, etc.

The same submission may not be submitted in different presentation types in hopes that one of them will be accepted. In such instances, all will be rejected without review.

Important! Deviation from the prescribed format, especially the number of pages, will result in rejection of the submission without review. Please see the submission template for reference.

Categories

The SPC solicits paper proposals both on fundamental informatics methods as well as systems and applications. Proposals must not be in press or under consideration for presentation or publication elsewhere. However, authors retain the right to make a pre-print version of the paper available on recognized preprint servers or personal/employer websites prior to acceptance for publication.

Authors must adhere to the formatting guidelines to avoid rejection.

Manuscripts must be formatted to fit on between 5-10 (8.5 x 11 inch) pages and include:

  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state, and country, if international) of all authors
  • Introduction, methods, results, discussion, and conclusion sections
  • A structured manuscript must be submitted that includes the following sections:
  • An abstract of 125-150 words summarizing the submission. The abstract must also be entered on the submission website in the Abstract box in Step 1.
  • Introduction – A short background and objective(s) of the study
  • Methods – Design, setting (if appropriate), patients or participants (if appropriate), interventions (if appropriate), and main outcome measurement
  • Results – Key findings
  • Discussion – Key conclusions with direct reference to the foundational or methodological advancement or biomedical application
    • Optional illustrations (figures or tables)
    • References, if applicable

The SPC invites students to submit papers that describe complete or nearly complete research or development efforts in informatics. All designated student papers must follow the paper format requirements (see above) and will first be reviewed through the SPC’s standard review process, along with all other submitted papers. Student papers that are accepted by the SPC will be presented in a regular paper session and included in the Informatics Summits Proceedings. Proposals must not be in press or under consideration for presentation or publication elsewhere. However, authors retain the right to make a pre-print version of the paper available on recognized preprint servers or personal/employer websites prior to acceptance for publication. Papers can only be submitted as a student paper or a regular paper, not both.

Individuals, who as of September 1, 2022, are enrolled in a degree granting program or in an academic program such as a medical residency or a post-doctoral fellowship, are eligible to submit a student paper. Work performed as part of a large, collaborative effort is acceptable; however, the student paper will be judged on the student’s specific contributions to the project, which must be clearly delineated. Only individual students, not groups, may submit student papers. Preparation of a manuscript must be entirely the work of the student, and single authorship is strongly encouraged. Co-authorship is usually limited to the student’s academic advisor. Entries from international students are encouraged. Student papers must adhere to the same requirements as described in the papers category, and in addition, student authors must provide in the online form:

  • The name and address of the training program
  • Clear identification of the primary advisor/mentor of the student submitting the paper
  • All co-authors and a description of that particular author’s contribution to the work
  • An attestation of the student’s contribution to the manuscript with respect to the following items:
    • (a) The text of the manuscript itself;
    • (b) The data collected for any analysis;
    • (c) The actual data analysis;
    • (d) The review of the literature;
    • (e) If a system was developed, the role of the student in the coding/development of the system; and
    • (f) The evaluation of the results and the formation of the conclusion

The student will be asked to upload a PDF of the attestation letter signed by their primary advisor confirming items a-f above

The podium abstract format allows for the presentation of cutting-edge unpublished research that the author wishes to reserve publication rights for future consideration or outstanding work previously published in a peer-reviewed journal. Priority will be given to previously unpublished work. Authors of accepted podium abstracts will have up to 18 minutes to present their work at the symposium including any questions and discussion.

Abstracts will not be indexed in MEDLINE, enabling authors to submit their best work that is destined for future journal publication. Contributions may also consist of abstracts based on work published in peer-reviewed journals in the last year (i.e., publication after August 2021); however, works published as proceedings for other conferences will not be accepted. Citation of the previous work is required.

Submissions must be submitted as a two-page (including all tables, figures, references, and acknowledgements) (U.S. Letter; 8.5 x 11 inch) document and include the names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state, and country, if international) of all authors.

A structured abstract must be submitted that includes the following sections:

  • Introduction – A short background and objective(s) of the study;
  • Methods – Design, setting (if appropriate), patients or participants (if appropriate), interventions (if appropriate), and main outcome measurement;
  • Results – Key findings;
  • Discussion – Key Conclusions with direct reference to the foundational advancement or biomedical application of the work;
  • Optional illustrations (figures or tables);
  • References.
  • All podium abstract submissions must have a brief (50-75 words) abstract. The abstract paragraph does NOT have to be part of the document but must be entered on the submission website in the online submission form.

Posters are the preferred format for presenting preliminary research results or results of small-scale studies. With the poster, authors illustrate and discuss innovative systems and services; describe experimental and in-practice projects and programs; and report experiences with educational programs and other dimensions of informatics. The poster sessions are vibrant and popular components of the Summit, offering direct access to the authors in a way not possible through podium presentations. At least one author must be present at the poster session.

Your uploaded poster manuscript file must be submitted as a one-page (8.5 x 11 inch) document and must include:

  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state, and country, if international) of all authors.
  • A description of the problem addressed and specific purposes of the system, service, or project; or, in the case of original research, an overview of the methodology, evaluation results, and conclusions
  • Optional illustrations (figures or tables), which must fit in the one-page limit
  • References, if applicable
  • Accepted posters will be presented on poster boards which are 8’ high by 4’ wide
  • All poster submissions must have a brief (50-75 words) abstract. The abstract does NOT have to be part of the document but must be entered on the submission website in the Abstract box (please DO NOT copy and paste the entire one-page document into that box).

The SPC invites students to submit posters. Posters are the preferred format for presenting preliminary research results or results of small-scale studies. With the poster, authors illustrate and discuss innovative systems and services; describe experimental and in-practice projects and programs; and report experiences with educational programs and other dimensions of informatics. The poster sessions are vibrant and popular components of the Informatics Summit, offering direct access to the authors in a way not possible through podium presentations. At least one author must be present at the poster session.

All designated student posters must follow the poster format requirements (see above) and will be reviewed through the SPC’s standard review process, along with all other submitted posters. Proposals must not be in press or under consideration for presentation or publication elsewhere. Posters can only be submitted as a student poster or a regular poster, not both.

Individuals, who as of September 1, 2022, are enrolled in a degree granting program or in an academic program such as a medical residency or a post-doctoral fellowship, are eligible to submit a student poster. Work performed as part of a large, collaborative effort is acceptable, however, only individual students, not groups, may submit student posters. Preparation of an abstract must be entirely the work of the student. Student posters must adhere to the same requirements as described in the Poster - Regular category.

Panel sessions are designed to present an integrated set of perspectives or experience on a current topic in translational science. Panel topics may be on a specific aspect of theory, application, policy, trends, or experience pertaining to any aspect of translational science, or may provide interdisciplinary viewpoints that cut across traditional themes. Panel submissions and presentations should demonstrate collective reflection and integration of the content presented by each of the panelists or offer engaged forms of dialogue and interaction between panelists and audience. Scholarly debate among presenters is encouraged, as are panels that incorporate science, practice, and policy themes to improve the conduct of clinical and translational research.

Panels should be limited to four participants and a moderator and should be timed to allow one-third to one-half of the session for audience participation. Panel organizers should include a description of how they plan to include/involve audience participation in their session. Panel sessions will typically be scheduled for 90-minutes. An individual may be the primary organizer of only one panel and may not participate on more than two panels total.

AMIA is committed to diversity, and we appreciate your efforts to select panelists with diverse institutional, gender, ethnicity, career status, and other diversity measures. Priority will be given to panels with diverse participants.

Your uploaded panel manuscript file must not exceed a maximum of three (8.5 x 11 inch) pages and must include:

  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state, and country, if international) of the panel organizer and all participants
  • An abstract of 125-150 words, describing the panel and its learning objectives, which should also be entered into the Abstract text box in Step 1 of the online form to be used in the online and print programs
  • A general description of the panel and the issue(s) that will be examined and a brief description of each panelist's presentation
  • An explanation why the topic of this panel is timely, urgent, needed, or attention grabbing is required with a discussion of anticipated audience.
  • A list of discussion questions to enhance audience participation.
  • A statement from the panel organizer that all participants have agreed to take part on the panel.

Informatics debate provides conference participants with the opportunity to use debate as a platform for presenting the pros and cons of a biomedical informatics issue. Debates can cover a wide range of topics including ethical, technology, policy, research, or otherwise-focused debates with specific implications for translational bioinformatics, clinical research informatics, or health data science. Informatics debate submissions must present a fair assessment of both the pros and cons of any topic. The debate submission should not appear biased towards one outcome.

Informatics debate should be limited to four participants and a moderator, and they should be timed to allow for audience participation, including pre- and post-debate assessment of agreement with the debate resolutions. A good debate often has two presenters who are presenting pros and two presenters presenting cons regarding a selected biomedical issue. There will be two 45-minute debates in a 90-minute session. An individual may be the primary organizer of only one informatics debate and may not participate on more than two debates total.

The uploaded informatics debate manuscript file must not exceed a maximum of three pages (including all tables, figures, references, and acknowledgements) (U.S. Letter; 8.5 x 11 inch) and include:

  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state, and country, if international) of the debate organizer and all participants;
  • An abstract of 150 words, describing the informatics debate and its learning objectives, which should also be entered into a text box at the beginning of the online form to be used in the online program;
  • A general description of the informatics debate and the issue(s) or position(s) that will be examined;
  • Explanation of the role of each participant in the debate, including if they will take the pro or the con.
  • An explanation why the topic of this informatics debate is timely and relevant to the AMIA audience;
  • A description of how the audience will be engaged in the debate;
  • A statement from the debate organizer that all participants have agreed to take part in the debate.

Half-day (3-hour) workshops are dedicated to in-depth treatment and collaborative discussion of special topics and interests of relevance to the broad biomedical informatics community. These workshops will be scheduled in two 90-minute slots, with a 30-minute break between.

These workshops are divided into two categories:

  1. Instructional Workshops, focusing on knowledge base and competency development by participants.
  2. Collaborative Workshops, intended to support the creation and ongoing activities of communities-of-practice within AMIA.

Workshops should have no more than five presenters.

Instructional Workshops should include a combination of didactic and interactive content delivery, as well as participant interaction. Such workshops should be designed to address the needs and interests of individuals at all levels of experience relative to the selected topic area(s) and be led by individuals with appropriate subject matter expertise. The SPC encourages proposals that will bring together individuals with similar or different roles in developing, implementing, or using informatics in practice, management, education, research, or policy. Further, the SPC seeks a balance between workshops that address essential core informatics theory and principles, with those that address practical applications, current issues, and emerging trends and developments in informatics, aligned with overall meeting themes.

Collaborative Workshops are intended to encourage participation and collaboration using mechanisms such as discussion forums (e.g., shorter didactic presentations or panels followed by group discussions), research forums (e.g., presentations and discussions related to scientific advancements in a targeted areas of informatics innovation and practice), or a challenge/competition (e.g., individual or group submissions addressing a specific topic or scientific/technical challenge).

The SPC may ask individuals proposing thematically similar workshops in an independent manner to integrate their submissions prior to acceptance.

AMIA is committed to diversity, and we appreciate your efforts to select participants with diverse institutional, gender, ethnicity, career status, and other diversity measures. Priority will be given to workshops with diverse participants.

Workshop proposals must not exceed a maximum of four pages (U.S. Letter; 8.5 x 11 inch) in length and include the following information:

  • A descriptive title for the workshop;
  • An indication of the workshop type (i.e., instructional or collaborative);
  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state/province, and country, if international) of all workshop faculty;
  • A summary of 250 to 300 words that describes the content of the workshop;
  • An outline of topics to be covered and description of interactive components of the workshop;
  • Specific educational objectives or outcomes that participants can expect to achieve;
  • A description of who should attend (e.g., clinicians, educators, leaders in healthcare or other organizations, researchers, policy makers, IT professionals);
  • A description of prerequisites knowledge that participant should have, if any;
  • Indicate if the workshop instructional level is introductory, intermediate, or advance or a combination. In the latter case, list the percentage of each level;
  • Experience of the workshop instructors/leaders in in the targeted content areas;
  • A list of conferences where this workshop has been previously presented, including past AMIA meetings

Systems demonstrations illustrate one or more aspects of a leading-edge system that is in use, under development, or at a testing or prototype stage. Each demonstration is 30 minutes long including questions and comments.

Your uploaded systems demonstration manuscript file must be submitted as a one-page (U.S. Letter; 8.5 x 11 inch) document and must include:

  • The names, academic degree(s), affiliations, and locations (city, state, and country, if international) of all presenters
  • An abstract of 50-75 words summarizing the proposal, which will also be entered into a text box at the beginning of the online form to be used in the online and print programs. The abstract does NOT have to be part of the document, but must be entered on the submission website in the Abstract box in Step 2. (Please DO NOT copy and paste the entire one-page document into that box)
  • A description of the specific purposes of the system, service, or project; the problems in health care practice, biomedicine, or research in informatics that it is designed to address; and the purpose or features of the system, service, or project that make it particularly innovative
  • A statement of the degree to which the system or service has been deployed, as of the date of submitting the proposal
  • The format of credentials and other author information appearing in the online and printed materials is subject to revision by the AMIA office. It is the responsibility of the first author of each proposal to provide full and accurate information about all co-authors on the submission.

 

Submission File Requirements

Your submission must adhere to the requirements in the templates (Word). Submissions which do not follow the template will be rejected without review.

Adherence to the following requirements ensures a consistency that facilitates a successful review process. Complete the online form as instructed and attach your manuscript file in compliance with the requirements noted below:

  • File must be in PDF format.
  • Adhere to the page length restrictions stated in the category descriptions.
  • Format for 8.5 x 11-inch paper size with one-inch margins left, right, top and bottom.
  • Place the title in 14-point Times New Roman typeface, single column, bold, centered, upper and lower case using initial capitals for each word in the title other than articles and prepositions.
  • Below the title include the names, credentials, institutions and locations of the author(s) or panelists, exactly as they are to appear in the on-line and print programs, using 12-point Times New Roman typeface, single-column, bold, centered, upper and lower case using appropriate capitals.
  • Include the main text of the proposal file single-spaced in 10-point Times New Roman typeface, justified, one-column format.
  • Do not number individual pages.
  • Remove all “track changes” markings, then disable track changes before uploading.

Reference Format

Use the following reference format: Cite all references in the text, tables or figure legends. In the text, use eight-point superscript if possible, to indicate reference numbers; if not possible, use 10-point numbers in square brackets. Under a centered heading “References” at the end of the proposal, provide a list of references cited, in order of occurrence in the manuscript, and with titles using initial capital only. List all authors of any cited work when there are six or fewer authors; if more than six, list only the first three followed by “et al.” Follow the Vancouver Style. References must fit within the allotted page(s).

Industry Submissions

Industry-authored and industry-client collaborative papers, abstracts, panels, demonstrations, ignite-style talks, and posters are welcome for submission as described above. No special submission designation is required. All industry submissions will be considered according to the standard review process. Industry submissions should not market and promote a specific product or company.

Submission Process and Deadlines

All proposals must be submitted through the submission site in accordance with the following deadline: September 14, 2022, 11:59 p.m. ET. There will be no exceptions.

For all submission categories, you will need to complete the online form as instructed and upload your abstract file in compliance with directions provided.

Decisions for all formats will be announced in early December.